the “I”

from Krishnamurti’s commentaries on living series 2 chapter 26

click picture to enlarge …

The outward and inward mind is ceaselessly active, receiving impressions; caught in its memories and reactions; it is an aggregate of many desires and conflicts. It functions only within the field of time, and in that field there is contradiction, the opposition of will or desire, which is effort. This psychological activity of the ‘I’, of the ‘me’ and the ‘mine’, must cease, for such activity causes problems and brings about various forms of agitation and disorder. But any effort to stop this activity only makes for greater activity and agitation.

If you are aware of the viciousness of this circle and realize that you cannot break it, then with this realization the censor, the observer, ceases to be.

Our problem, then, is this: is it possible for the activity of desire to come to an end voluntarily, freely, without any form of compulsion? It is only when this happens that the mind can be still. If you are aware of this as a fact, does not the activity of desire come to an end?

The demand for the cessation of the ‘I’ becomes the new activity of the ‘I’; but it is not new, it is merely another form of desire. Only when the mind is spontaneously still can the other, that which is not of the mind, come into being.


Pictures by bvdb (whoisbert) march 2014 @home – Canon Ixus HS230 – IMG_6521

Advertisements

10 thoughts on “the “I”

  1. When we let go of the thinking and wanting (which is the compulsion of the mind) then we have a chance to experience what we are looking for. The more analysis the more out of balance we become … and further away from the experience that we seek.
    As a wise grandmother would say .. don’t try so hard. Trust it is already there within you.

    • … perhaps the subconscious “what we are looking for” already spoils part of the adventure ,,, or perhaps not …
      Everything we say and write, all these words, are exercises in saying what can not be said. Perhaps, ‘what we are looking for’ is nothing more than an expression of what can not be put into words, …

  2. This psychological activity of the ‘I’, of the ‘me’ and the ‘mine’, must cease, for such activity causes problems and brings about various forms of agitation and disorder. But any effort to stop this activity only makes for greater activity and agitation -very well said !!!loved it 🙂

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s