bridges

click the thumbnails, to see more details

that futility of existence …

and still able to find value
still able to pass on values
through that labyrinth of vacuity

this way,
we feel appreciated,

once in a blue moon

dragging ourselves
from encounter

to wonderment
to yet another encounter
and yet another wonderment

these two factors,
and only these two,
are capable to dismiss
the mental control

able to uproot
that meaninglessness
rooted in its mental realms

two are able to bridge
the vacuity of being
forging meaninglessness
into a lonely mental detail


Pictures by bvdb (whoisbert) march 2014/june 2013 – @botanique Leuven – Canon Ixus HS230 – IMG_3401-3451-6895

Advertisements

13 thoughts on “bridges

  1. Should not have sent the comment yet. Even taking photos capturing awe could be seen as meaningless though I don’t think it is. But, I remember in NYC after 9/11 all of photography except of the scene of the tragedy, seemed meaningless and yet maybe people needed photos of spider webs more then than ever.

    • the spiderweb is empty of any meaning. we give it a value. we like to see a kind of ethereal order.

      but at the other hand, this kind of order, whether visual, auditive or just a small, can create that silence in the mind. It still has no meaning, and it remains empty for a purpose, but we might glimpse the world behind thought and grow beyond all the -isms that most societies are built upon,

      • Yes, the spider web speaks of another world, a world far removed from the -isms of societies– it is just as you say. So, although in violent mourning, the spider web might have offered a panacea. But the problem was that people felt all was useless– that we should all be saving lives. I don’t know the answer.

        • In the year 2000, Wim Kayzer made a TV-series on ‘beauty and consolation’ on dutch television. Although I was then living the life of a young entrepreneur that thought anything is possible, and I was not really looking for consolation in any form, I was fascinated by it. 26 writers, philosophers, musicians, artists and scientists talked about their very personal experiences and what kept them going. (this link includes some googling – http://www.google.com/search?q=%27beauty+and+consolation%27+wim+kayzer&tbm=vid )
          Drop by drop, these interviews have trickled through my unconscious.
          All kinds of beauty came forward: a scientific formula, philosophical ideas, a dance, love and art. And most unexpected, Freeman Dyson: “We know nothing of beauty. Not sure why the feeling arose in our evolution, not where it is localized in the brain. Literally nothing we know about it. It is an impossible theme. Where do you start? You can ask me anything, but for me there is only one item on the agenda,” .. and then he started talking about his children and grandchildren … never touched any other subject the next 80 minutes …

          Mentally I have been thinking for almost 15 years on that combination of two words: beauty >< consolation.

          Finally I discovered that beauty is not something mental. Whatever the form, beauty has a very strong power: it will not stop any mourning. But it will stop all that thinking that makes mourning so much worse, for a moment and another moment, and the another … . The emotional sadness will slowly be replaced by enjoyed 'silence of the mind'.
          There lies the power of 'what we find beautiful'. It has a power of breaking the worrying and pondering for a moment, and another moment, and if you do that long enough, …

          One of the most powerful forms of beauty are genuine smiles and hugs. The unexpected feeling of a disappearing identity, … as if you feel you are nothing and everything at the same time …
          So here is a genuine written hug and a written genuine smile … πŸ™‚

          • Thank you for this wonderful comment and for the links which I bookmarked– all of them. Very, very interesting and relevant to what I am trying to sort out in my mind. It does sort of legitimize the pursuit of beauty and the attempt to convey it to others. A very humbling pursuit. Not so sure about the pursuit of art which I do see as different because it is not always awe and beauty and nature but people can be comforted and moved and influenced by art. Not that I really have a choice. I will pursue both as long as I am able or whenever I am able and I hope that you will, too. Thanks again for all the clarification. And, yes, smiles and hugs go a long way and are such small things that have a big effect. Oneness.

  2. Yes, the futility of existence and yet the human spirit suffuses it with meaning and in so doing touches others. Like you touched the blogging world with that beautiful photo of the spider web with dew.

    • … they seem to like it when it is not really sharp and at the brink of being deleted πŸ™‚ … [a bit sarcastic now … i know]
      I will try a DSLR this month to experience the heavy dimension, then evaluate … but it will not fit in the pocket of my coat.

  3. When we stop seeking meaning, meaninglessness fades away. Bridges, blinds and stairways simply become soft underbellies that smile for cameras. Wonderful photos. Thank you.

    • well, that is the slow approach, that I find wonderful in itself. Slowly changing the habit of searching into an acceptance of what is. Then I seem to acknowledge this by using the spaces in ‘time’ when mind is silent by itself. Then let those spaces develop …
      perhaps this is all the same thing πŸ™‚ and just worded differently.

  4. ‘the futility of existence …’ Why, or more correctly ‘How”, futility when the purpose is just the opposite? Here is the meaning of the word “futile” as defined by the OED: Incapable of producing any useful result; pointless.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s